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International Day of Forest 2019

Forests are part of your life in more ways than you realize

When we drink a glass of water, write in a notebook, take medicine for a fever or build a house, we do not always make the connection with forests. And yet, these and many other aspects of our lives are linked to forests in one way or another. Forests, their sustainable management and use of resources, including in fragile ecosystems, are key to combating climate change, and to contributing to the prosperity and well-being of current and future generations. Forests also play a crucial role in poverty alleviation and in the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

In recognition of these important interlinkages between forests and education, the central theme of the 2019 International Day of Forests is “Forests and education.” The International Day of Forests is observed annually on 21 March, provides a global platform to raise awareness of the importance of all types of forests and trees.

Forests and Education – Learn to Love Forests

Every 21 March the United Nations raises awareness of the importance of all types of forests. This year the International Day of Forests promotes education to Learn to Love Forests. It underscores the importance of education at all levels in achieving sustainable forest management and biodiversity conservation. Healthy forests mean healthy, resilient communities and prosperous economies.

Key messages:

Understanding our forests and keeping them healthy is crucial for our future. Forests will be more important than ever as the world population climbs to 8.5 billion by 2030.

You’re never too young to start learning about trees. Helping children connect with nature creates future generations conscious of the benefits of trees and forests and the need to manage them sustainably.

Both modern and traditional knowledge are key to keeping forests healthy. While foresters should know and understand nature well, they should also learn to use cutting-edge technology to ensure that our forests are monitored and managed sustainably.

Investing in forestry education can change the world for the better. Countries can help ensure there are scientists, policy makers, foresters and local communities working to halt deforestation and restore degraded landscapes.

Women and men should have equal access to forest education. Gender parity in forest education empowers rural women to sustainably manage forests.

The International Day of Forests was established by the UN General Assembly in 2012. Activities held around the world range from scientific conferences and workshops, to art exhibits, tree-planting and community-level events. The theme of the International Day reflects the multi-faceted values of forests, highlighting how forests enrich our daily lives and support global sustainability.

Activities:

Share Experience and Taking into Action in Loving Forest in China

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On the occasion of International Day of Forest, China was invited to share Three-North Shelterbelt Forest (TSF) Program as the case of outstanding contribution to forest protection and rehabilitation in UN Headquarter in New York.

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The celebration activity of International Day of Forest was held in UN Headquarters in New York on March 21, 2019.

Tree Planting in Beijing to observe International Day of Forest

In the capital of China, 240 representatives from 20 economies, NGOs, organizations and public joined the tree planting activity in Beijing on March 22, 2019 to commemorate the International Day of Forest.

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Photo:Xinhua

Throughout human history, forests and trees have been connected to learning, wisdom and enlightenment. Forests and trees have served as outdoor classrooms, providing healthy learning-locations for outdoor-education and fostering environmental stewardship in children from an early age.

Forests are among the world’s most productive renewable natural resources, providing sustainable paths to development as a key driver of economic growth while providing livelihoods for hundreds of millions of people, particularly in rural areas.

Education is a key enabler for sustainable development, and for the sustainable management of forests. Learning about forests, and their sustainable management is not just good for the environment, it is the foundation for sustainable livelihood and communities.

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