infomati

ASIA&AFRICA, Oct.8, China Daily - It looks like a giant four-legged pine cone with a long snout and longer tail. Its scales are sharp and it can roll into a ball when threatened. It has powerful, sharp front claws so long that they have to be tucked under to walk on and it can put out a smell that rivals a skunk's. It has no teeth but its spaghetti-thin tongue, designed for eating ants, can extend 16 inches — almost half its body length —beyond its snout.

10.9 An enigmatic animal faces extinction for the wrong reasons

The critically endangered pangolin is hunted, traded and killed for its scales and meat. [Provided to China Daily]

Read more ...

CHINA, Oct.7, China Daily - When Li Bingbing talks about being one of the most popular superstars in China, the Transformers 4 actress humbly likes to start with where she is from, the root, as many Chinese people say.

That root, says Li, has given her a strong awareness about nature and the environment.

10.8 Li Bingbing also acts on behalf of wildlife

Chinese actress Li Bingbing is United Nations Environment Programme Goodwill Ambassador. Hu Haidan / China Daily

Read more ...

NAIROBI, Oct. 7, Xinhua - The International police organization, known as Interpol, pledged Monday to assist the East Africa region to build a regional intelligence database as part of effort to combat wildlife crime.

Read more ...

ALASKA, October 4, Xinhua - The northern elephant seal and the southern elephant seal, which were hunted to the brink of extinction by the end of the 19th century, now the numbers have recovered. The northern elephant seal, somewhat smaller than its southern relative, ranges over the Pacific coast of the U.S.,Canada and Mexico,but the total number of elephant seals are decreased each year, if not well protected, it would be faced the brink of extinction again.

10.4 Thousands of elephant seals strand on Alaska shore

Thousands of elephant seals strand on Alaska shore. (Source: cri.cn)

Read more ...

GENEVA, Sept. 30, Xinhua - The World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) on Tuesday said in a report that global wildlife populations have declined by more than half over the last four decades.

Read more ...
Scroll to top